Hardwire vs. NEMA 14-50 Plug

There are two options for adding a level 2 charger to your home, hardwired and NEMA 14-50. In this article, we will compare the differences between hardwiring an EV charger and installing a NEMA 14-50 outlet for charging an EV. If you are in need of a charger, check out our EV charger shop. Note this page contains affiliate links.

Hardwiring

Hardwiring an EV charger involves installing the charging unit directly into the electrical system of the home. This typically involves running a dedicated circuit from the main electrical panel to the location where the charger will be installed and then connecting the charger to this circuit. The advantage of hardwiring an EV charger is that it allows the charger to be powered directly from the electrical system, which can provide a faster and more reliable charging experience. However, the main drawback of a hardwired system is that you cannot bring the charger with you on the go. Once it is wired, it is permanently fixed into the electrical system unless a licensed electrician removes it. An example of a hardwired charger is the Tesla Wall Connector.

NEMA 14-50 Outlet

An alternative to hardwiring an EV charger is to install a NEMA 14-50 outlet, which is the same type of electrical outlet that most house hold dryers are plugged into. The only difference is the NEMA 14-50 used for an EV charger is more heavy duty and allows for plugging and unplugging. This outlet can be installed in a similar manner to any other electrical outlet, by running a circuit from the main electrical panel and connecting it to the outlet.

One advantage of installing a NEMA 14-50 outlet is that it is generally easier and less expensive than hardwiring an EV charger. In addition, a NEMA 14-50 outlet can be used with a plug-in EV charger, which allows the charger to be easily moved or removed if necessary.

However, there are also some potential drawbacks to using a NEMA 14-50 outlet for EV charging. One disadvantage is that the charging experience may be slower than with a hardwired charger, as the outlet may be subject to voltage drop or other electrical issues. An example of an EV charger that uses a NEMA 14-50 outlet is the Emporia EV Charger.

Conclusion

In summary, hardwire vs. NEMA 14-50 plug is something that most electric vehicle owners will have to consider at some point. Hardwiring an EV charger can provide a faster and more reliable charging experience, but it is a more complex and expensive process. Installing a NEMA 14-50 outlet is generally easier and less expensive. The chargers for each type of installation are completely different so it’s important to understand what type you already have or ensure that you purchase the correct type.

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